In Network Marketing you have to get eyeballs on your presentation, whatever that looks like. It could be a DVD, online video, home meeting, sizzle call, etc. You simply have to ask people to check out the tool to see if it is something that have openness to. Every other aspect of network marketing training is really to keep you doing just that and trainers understand all the mental garbage that goes along with rejection and having people tell you no. I think everyone should experience a super high rejection job prior to coming into network marketing to prepare them. Let me explain…

Takl providers can connect with local people to get paid for tasks like lawn care, junk hauling, cleaning, and small home repair. Providers receive 70% of the preset job price for any job they accept, which increases to 80% if Providers are requested as a ‘favorite’. Providers keep 90% of any service that the customer requests in addition to the original job, called “While You’re At It” services. Providers receive 100% of all tips and disposal fees.


I don’t care where doTERRA in ranked. The oils are good, but the company SUCKS. It is all built on big bloggers. Don’t have a big blog – you’re going to make pennies while others demand you make a minimum $100 a month order. The company itself has great customer service, but try to reach compliance or tell them that your uplines are making fake accounts or ordering off multiple people in the downline just to ensure they make bonuses and NO ONE listens. It’s supposedly geared to help the underdog succeed – this is a gimmick.
I have a friend who is proposing I join Arbonne? She would be good to work with although I am not educated on all the MLM companies and don’t want to make the wrong choice. I also have a blog which I want to leverage and it seems like most of the health and wellness MLMs utilize hosted parties. Are there any that are more internet based that have had a long time track record! Thanks and sorry for all the questions!
The first wave of MLMs were the likes of Avon, which was founded in 1886, and used the door-to-door model for selling perfume. From then and up until the middle of the last century, many women did not have the means to sample products and shop at a department store — or, in the case of African American women, they were simply not allowed to enter the store at all. And they certainly didn’t have the means to start their own business and earn a real income.

MLM, also referred to as direct selling or network marketing, uses a different approach to sell products and services. MLM is different from single-level marketing, where a salesperson earns a commission for selling directly to the consumer. As a MLM operator, you must create you own sales distribution channel. MLM businesses resemble that of a pyramid structure, where you as the top salesperson earns a profit from all sales generated under the sales distribution line that you create. This income is referred to as "residual" income, and is the greatest source of income to your company.
One of the greatest pitfalls most network marketers fall into is the lure of huge potential income from an MLM business. Therefore, they end up not paying enough attention to what the company is asking them to sell. In MLM, as in any other industry, you can’t sell something effectively that you aren’t proud of. You won’t be enthusiastic about it, and potential customers will be able to smell that lack of enthusiasm from a mile away.
Before approaching the prospects, you need to target your audience. One of the biggest mistakes new MLMers make is looking at everyone as a potential customer. This is an area where the MLM  industry gets wrong. Like any other business, you’re going to have greater success and efficiency if you identify your target market or audience and focus your marketing efforts at them.
Thanks for this post. Very helpful. I do like direct sales; one reason for this is that it helps keep alive that age-old tradition of people interacting face-to-face (rather than mainly through texting and social media). For that reason, I think MLMs should target the lonely Millennials. Anyway, I was a member/distributor of Advocare for over 10 years and still miss the products and the activities in the company, now that I am temporarily out. I still plan to sign up again when I can afford it (long story–I’ll spare you). I am now involved in Melaleuca, and I must say in their defense that Melaleuca’s products are actually not overpriced. Because Preferred Customers are not only not expected, but also NOT ALLOWED to turn around and sell the products at the retail price, everyone pays the same low prices. (Granted, one can indeed go to the website and buy directly from the company if they do not want to become a Preferred Customer. Why would someone do that when the annual membership is only $19? Only if they do not want to commit to the minimum monthly requirement for Preferred Customers.) Public, keep this in mind! Don’t be fooled by the rebels who are selling old Melaleuca products on Amazon for way above the retail price!! You’re much better off buying fresh products directly from the factory, even if you pay retail price. Just sayin. My big question: What about Tupperware? I have been a Tupperware consultant for about 6 months, and I have found it to be extremely difficult to keep business going. The directors training me have said that Tupperware is the second most widely recognized brand name in the world, second only to Coca-Cola. If that is the case, why is it so hard to find people willing to host Tupperware parties? Why does it seem so hard to sell? Also, is it just me…Or, does Tupperware’s compensation plan stink? 

You read that right. Millionaires in this industry all have one thing in common: They were willing Failures at first, to build the Success that lasts. (READ THAT AGAIN!) You MUST be willing to fail, as you build your will to win. It is the setbacks and the devastations that build Success in MLM. be willing to fail, but then get up, and keep going. That is the secret.
The FTC’s case against BurnLounge provides an example. BurnLounge argued that its participants bought product packages consisting of sales websites and music-related merchandise because they wanted to use the merchandise. When BurnLounge’s product packages were untied from the business opportunity, however, monthly sales of these packages plummeted by almost 98 percent. At most, actual demand was responsible for only a small minority of package sales, and BurnLounge was found to have an unfair or deceptive compensation structure. 
As with any business venture, it’s important to manage your expectations when signing on with an MLM. Marketing materials may sell you the idea of making good money without leaving your house, but business ventures like these take time to deliver a return on investment. Not every sales agent will be making $100,000 per year right away or even five years down the line. Be realistic about how much you’re likely to sell and how much you’re likely to earn.

Delivery jobs vary in their specific functions, but they all allow independent contractors like yourself to travel, create a flexible schedule, and deliver goods (as opposed to passengers). Jobs like Postmates give you the ability to work short gigs during times like your lunch break or at night, while others like Roadie allow you to use space in your car for somewhere you are already going to deliver a package.

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