Hi Ray, All great tips! I love tips no. 7 most. Yes, I agree that it is the biggest of all the Network Marketing tips. We will be forever working on our business if we do not have systems already in place so that ANY new team members can get training and success tips easily. The 'leader' is in trouble. I first learned this from Tom Challan who had found himself trapped in the 'leadership role'! Excellent insights, Ray, about true leadership!
You do not need much to start building your empire gradually hence a great medium to use. Never forget that network marketing is not only selling products and services, it also involves prospecting, recruiting, training, follow-ups, accounting and so much more. You can make it a full-time job if you develop the mindset required and invest your time and energy in it.
People don’t go to Social Media to be sold, they’re there to be Social. If you’re doing any kind of business on Social Media or you want to, for the love of everything Social, please please read Jab Jab Jab Right Hook by Gary Vaynerchuk. It will help you understand how to respect the Social Media platforms so you get more engagement and more people asking about your business on Social Media. The book is also great in showing you how to offer value and share stories first before ever asking for anything in return.

It's only natural to share something that appealed to or worked for you. Network marketing gives you the opportunity to cash in on that sharing and Plexus has the exclusive products people are talking about. You can start your business for as little as $34.95 with two great product packages of $99 and $199 upon enrollment. Whether you are trying to make extra monthly income to help with the car payment or you want to earn an extraordinary income, Plexus provides you with an opportunity to achieve your dreams based on your skill and efforts. – See more at: http://maeh.myplexusproducts.com/

The Direct Selling Association (DSA), a lobbying group for the MLM industry, reported that in 1990 only 25% of DSA members used the MLM business model. By 1999, this had grown to 77.3%.[26] By 2009, 94.2% of DSA members were using MLM, accounting for 99.6% of sellers, and 97.1% of sales.[27] Companies such as Avon, Electrolux, Tupperware,[28] and Kirby were all originally single-level marketing companies, using that traditional and uncontroversial direct selling business model (distinct from MLM) to sell their goods. However, they later introduced multi-level compensation plans, becoming MLMs.[23] The DSA has approximately 200 members[29] while it is estimated there are over 1,000 firms using multi-level marketing in the United States alone.[30] 

This issue, like all issues concerning the evaluation of an MLM’s compensation structure, is fact-specific and usually involves a comprehensive analysis of a variety of factors. It is worthwhile, however, to highlight two topics that the FTC is likely to consider when evaluating an MLM’s payment of compensation that is premised, in part, on participants buying product that is not resold. First, the FTC staff is likely to consider whether features of the MLM’s compensation structure incentivize or encourage participants to purchase product for reasons other than satisfying their own personal demand or actual consumer demand in the marketplace. Second, the FTC staff is likely to consider information bearing on whether particular wholesale purchases by business opportunity participants were made to satisfy personal demand. The persuasiveness of this information in any particular case will depend on its reliability.
I have been looking over your sites and viewing the many videos. It sounds appealing however there are many many . . . many lead generators out there, some that are well established (and very good at what they do) and so my question is why would I pay you to train me for 5 weeks and think I could compete (let alone generate income) in the short period you mention?
As non-employees, participants are not protected by legal rights of employment law provisions. Instead, salespeople are typically presented by the MLM company as "independent contractors" or "independent business owners". However, participants do not possess a business in the traditional legal sense, as the participants do not hold any tangible business assets or intangible business goodwill able to be sold or purchased in a sale or acquisition of a business. These are the property of the MLM company.
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