Delivery jobs vary in their specific functions, but they all allow independent contractors like yourself to travel, create a flexible schedule, and deliver goods (as opposed to passengers). Jobs like Postmates give you the ability to work short gigs during times like your lunch break or at night, while others like Roadie allow you to use space in your car for somewhere you are already going to deliver a package.

Instacart allows you to make money by doing someone else’s grocery shopping. Set your hours, receive orders on your smartphone, hit the grocery store, deliver, and get paid. Shoppers can make up to $25/hour. To get started, shoppers must complete an online application, pass a background check, and attend an interview/training session. Don’t have a car? Not a problem: shoppers on foot and bicycle are welcome.
Get a Franklin Planner, or some kind of Day Timer, and start scheduling your actions and tasks. Yes, you can use a palm pilot, but I have found that planners are more effective for new people. When are you going to start your business, decide how many hours are you planning on working, and then highlight the hours you are going to spend working. This will give you a visual map of what your week looks like.
When it comes to lead services, most businesses do not have as much to offer you as we do. In fact, most of our competitors do not even offer true qualified leads. Instead, they pull as much information as they can from public records, especially from secondhand public records databases that may not be accurate in the first place. After all, when was the last time you saw one of those “data aggregator” websites that was actually legitimate?
In an October 15, 2010 article, it was stated that documents of a MLM called Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing reveal that 30 percent of its representatives make no money and that 54 percent of the remaining 70 percent only make $93 a month, before costs. Fortune was under investigation by the Attorneys General of Texas, Kentucky, North Dakota, and North Carolina with Missouri, South Carolina, Illinois, and Florida following up complaints against the company.[39] The FTC eventually stated that Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing was a pyramid scheme and that checks totaling more than $3.7 million were being mailed to the victims.[40]
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