One of the best skincare products in and outside of MLM, no doubt. They were founded by a couple dermatologists, and they used to be an upscale department store brand before entering the world of network marketing. Rodan and Fields created Proactiv, which ended up being one of the most famous skincare products of all time (and a hero-in-a-bottle for every middle schooler who’s ever been called pizza-face). Just this one product line is nearing $1 billion in annual sales.
You should be able to retain and share all the stories involved in your business with your prospects. The more stories you share about your company or business with people, the more you expose your business opportunity to the world and attract more people. MLM Recruiting stars in network marketing are good storytellers, and you should tell good stories to be able to recruit people to your business.
They have the stay-at-home-mother meets women entrepreneur mixture working for them. What does that even mean? Means they have the practicality side of the company that is off the product and they have the sales, entrepreneur people them promoting it, too. Anyone who follows MLM knows its usually too “product practical” (see: Tupperware, Cutco) or too “opportunity-centric” (see: Herbalife).
Skills – There are certain technical skills you need for whatever industry you are a part of, so it’s important to develop those skills.  Although, they are a small fraction of what your success will be predicated on.  You must eventually learn to outsource the things that make the most sense to outsource, so that you can work on the business versus in the business.
Right now, MLMs are preying on lower-income, often undocumented immigrant communities and taking advantage of their lack of knowledge and finances. Their reps lure them in by telling that they are giving them the tools to start their own businesses and that they can create jobs for their friends and family members. In the 2016 documentary, Betting On Zero, director Ted Braun talks to several Latino families who have lost their entire life savings to Herbalife. They were told by MLM reps that it’s easy work and that it’s not dangerous, and so they sold their construction businesses to invest in Herbalife.
Often the only way to make these sales is to recruit people under you (making commission off their starter kits) or to buy products yourself. Otherwise you’re left trying to sell your products to friends, family, mums at the school gates, and anyone you come into contact with (one of the reasons why some of the more pushy/desperate MLM reps get a bad reputation).
"The number one piece of advice I would give to up and coming sales professionals is to understand the personalities of your prospect. Most of us in sales tend to speak from "our" point of view not the point of view of the prospect which in turn can eliminate the prospect from buying. Always keep in mind their motivation to purchase whatever you're marketing and keep pressing on that motivation "button" and it will yield more sales in the future." - Cedrick Harris
"People like doing business with individuals that make them feel good.  In other words, you’re going to get a lot more business when you’re not simply there to ‘get’ your clients money in exchange for what you’re selling.  Think of it this way.  Be the person who they’d want to actually spend time with outside of a business setting.  It doesn’t mean you have to be their best friend and hang out together, it simply means that you’re showing you care through your actions.  One of the best things you can do is reach out to a potential client when they least expect it, with no agenda, no contract, no pitch…and just say ‘hello’ to see how they’re doing.” - Todd Falcone
In an October 15, 2010 article, it was stated that documents of a MLM called Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing reveal that 30 percent of its representatives make no money and that 54 percent of the remaining 70 percent only make $93 a month, before costs. Fortune was under investigation by the Attorneys General of Texas, Kentucky, North Dakota, and North Carolina with Missouri, South Carolina, Illinois, and Florida following up complaints against the company.[39] The FTC eventually stated that Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing was a pyramid scheme and that checks totaling more than $3.7 million were being mailed to the victims.[40]
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