Not only are “home businesses” or “MLM’s” very interesting, they are successful. Many of the longest standing organizations in this country have this business model. MLM is a marketing strategy in which the sales force is compensated not only for sales they personally generate, but also for the sales of others they recruit, creating a downline of distributors and a hierarchy of multiple levels of compensation. Most commonly, the salespeople are expected to sell products directly to consumers by means of relationship referrals and word of mouth marketing. Sounds legit right – so why the bad press?
Using link referral sites is another great way to generate free MLM leads. Link referral sites are basically a database of websites and blogs grouped in categories. After creating an account the network marketer will be asked to review up to 15 other websites and write a review of each on a daily basis. This is a great way to make new friends and expand the network of referrals.
I see Melaleuca on here. I see that as both good and bad. They are an awesome company with a great compensation plan. However, they are not an MLM. They are not even listed with the federal agency that oversees those companies. They are a Consumer Direct Marketing company. How does that differ? While I am required to purchase a certain amount each month, that’s all I need to purchase. It’s all products I use in my own home for myself. I don’t have a monthly quota to meet. I don’t have to buy product and sell it to people. The idea is that the product goes to the consumer only. In fact, it’s against company policy to buy product and sell it to others. The only comparison I see are the “levels” of customerS in my group. Can you shed any light on why you think they are an MLM? Thanks, so much!
Carl Rehnborg is credited as having started the multi-level marketing industry back in the 1930s. After learning about the benefits of dietary supplements in China, Rehnborg came back to the United States and started a company called The California Vitamin Company, which was later rebranded to Nutrilite. Six years after that rebranding, Rehnborg reorganized the company’s structure and the way it sold products into what we know as MLM today.
"New School" is to have a presence on the internet, learn how to attract the millions of interested prospects from around the world about your opportunity, and add them to your list online.  Then, because they have the same vision as you do, you learn how to support their business, while at the same time making money from the products you offer and from the business opportunity that everyone shares as a common vision. 
As one of the industry's best-known MLM consultants, Mike and the Sheffield team have assisted more than 300 national and international company start-ups. Mike is also a recognized leader in MLM product research and development. He and his team of experts design, reformulate and evaluate product lines for clients worldwide. Millions of readers have relied on Mike's popular "Product Of The Month" column in Money Maker's Monthly to help them evaluate MLM products and services. He also serves as product editor for Wealth Building magazine and is a regular writer for the Direct Sales Journal. In addition, he has educated more than 200,000 independent MLM distributors through his seminars and his 16-cassette-tape MLM training course, "Putting The Pieces Together." Contact Mike at 1805 N. Scottsdale Rd., #7, Tempe, AZ 85281; (480) 968-6199; fax (480) 968-6306; http://www.sheffieldnet.com.
Develop a referral program. Just like in other businesses, people who are referred by others are easier to convert to a sale than people who weren't, because they're usually coming to you with some interest in buying. Many people you talk to won't be interested in buying right away, but they might know people who are. Happy customers may want to share your product or business. You can develop a referral program to give people incentive to refer others to you. For example, you can give them a 10 percent discount on their next purchase for every new customer they refer. 
Disclaimer: The information contained in this document is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as financial or tax advice. It is not intended to be a substitute for obtaining accounting or other financial advice from an appropriate financial adviser or for the purpose of avoiding U.S. Federal, state or local tax payments and penalties.
To start, pick out a product or two that you feel good about. Then select two to three proven sales methods from your training materials. Concentrate on these methods, avoiding the temptation to expand. In other words, "narrowcast" rather than "broadcast" your efforts. Do the same with your sponsoring methods: Pick two concepts you're comfortable with and focus on these.
You must select a mentor you respect who has a history of success. If you were an employer hiring a new employee, would you be skeptical of someone who was a job hopper? Make sure your mentor is not an MLM junkie. Look for someone who believes in career MLM opportunities. To consistently earn the type of income you dream about, you must find a solid company, build a loyal distributorship and customer organization, and resist the impulse to jump on every hot new deal. Too many hot deals that fail will simply waste your time and money and leave you cold.
While MLM patriarchs may cry hoarse on the many advantages of an MLM business, it is always a great idea to look out for the red flags. Not every Multilevel Marketing venture turns out to be an ‘Amway’, & it is best to remain cognizant of the problems typically faced by business owners. Right from poor support & services, data insecurity, inadequate business intelligence, lack of industrial knowledge to the obstacles stacked up when choosing an allied technology partner this is no smooth ride.
I appreciate this comment. I’m a doTERRA gal. When I signed up I said I’d never sell. I just wanted to buy and use the oils. Then because of my love for them, people started coming to me for education and asking where they could get oils. So now I sell them. I’m not a sales person. I can’t bug my friends about stuff. But I’m growing this business because I truly believe in the products and use them every single day. I may not ever become rich from this and that’s OK with me. I won’t consider it a failure. Every person I help is a success in my book! 
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