While MLM patriarchs may cry hoarse on the many advantages of an MLM business, it is always a great idea to look out for the red flags. Not every Multilevel Marketing venture turns out to be an ‘Amway’, & it is best to remain cognizant of the problems typically faced by business owners. Right from poor support & services, data insecurity, inadequate business intelligence, lack of industrial knowledge to the obstacles stacked up when choosing an allied technology partner this is no smooth ride.
I’d like to point out a few things: statistically something like 96% of businesses fail within the first 5-10 years, which is a much more impactful loss, both financially and time wise, than the few hundred dollars one puts into whatever product they’re using in MLM. So realistically the success rate as a “self employed business owner” with MLM is probably a bit better than it is with launching a traditional business, or at least consistent with it. It takes discipline and tenacity that many people don’t have- that’s why they chose to remain employees in the first place.
Do you consider yourself a natural caregiver? Then you may want to check out Care.com, where you can work a variety of gigs in pet care, child care, senior care, housekeeping and errand-running. Simply create a profile describing your skills and certifications, browse open positions, and apply for only the jobs you want. You can also set how much you want to work: “occasional” (less than 10 hours per week), “Part-time” (25 hours per week) or “Full-time” (40 hours per week).
One of the benefits of MLM is the ability to bring in new business builders and profit from the sales they make in their business. While some see this as “using” others, the reality is that you’re being rewarded for helping others succeed. But for them to succeed, you need to see your role not as racking up as many recruits as possible, but in being a leader and trainer. The focus then is on the success of those you help in the business, not on you.
×