The Filipino community, much like many immigrant communities, is ripe for the recruitment of participants in MLMs. Filipino immigrants can be particularly easy targets to exploit, as this Filipino-American writer can attest. They are easygoing and friendly. The ones with a college education understand and speak English very well. The community is crawling with network marketers hawking everything from cosmetics to travel packages to insurance products, courtesy of companies that promise the dream of passive income as well as incentives such as car bonuses and vacations.

People today want to be understood. They wan to feel like they matter. And the greatest 2 words you can say, are "I understand." Agree with them in part, by jumping over to their side of the fence, and seeing it from their perspective. You may not totally agree with their view, but you can understand it, and that will go a long way to connecting you to that prospect. Understand first, then take a stand second, with that in mind.
Then figure out where your target customers can be found—both physically and virtually. College students who need more income can be found on campus or on online forums or websites about learning to manage your money. Athletes and people who lead healthy lifestyles can be found at gyms and online groups or websites about running, yoga, healthy eating, and more.
The major defining difference between other companies and MLM, is that they don’t mass market themselves, spending millions of dollars on television, radio and internet ads, but instead allocate that portion of their budget to pay hard working distributors who pound the pavement, form personal al relationships with clients, advocate their product, and hence donthe “marketing” for them.
AKA Build Like A Boss, The B-LAB is Tanya Aliza’s FREE Facebook Mastermind group full of awesome Networkers and Entrepreneurs that are all on a mission to grow their businesses Faster and easier with Online Strategies for prospecting, recruiting and sales. We do themed days of the week, we hold each other accountable and we lift each other up! Come introduce yourself and your business.
"We have been using National-Leads.com since the end of March, 2007 and recommending them to our team. We are very pleased with the conversion from the 1-7 day old email leads and the price is affordable for everyone. We use them with an autoresponder and once they sign up for our free offer, follow up with them. We are delighted to discover they are very qualified MLM leads with people eager to get their business started. The support with National Leads is phenomenal. They offer training and tips for good tools we can use with our businesses. The owner is funny, very personable and has a great heart for people. Take our word for it, this is the kind of home business leads company you want to make a part of your advertising budget."
"We have been using National-Leads.com since the end of March, 2007 and recommending them to our team. We are very pleased with the conversion from the 1-7 day old email leads and the price is affordable for everyone. We use them with an autoresponder and once they sign up for our free offer, follow up with them. We are delighted to discover they are very qualified MLM leads with people eager to get their business started. The support with National Leads is phenomenal. They offer training and tips for good tools we can use with our businesses. The owner is funny, very personable and has a great heart for people. Take our word for it, this is the kind of home business leads company you want to make a part of your advertising budget."
Selecting a competent MLM sponsor is as important as selecting the right company. Choose your sponsor just as you would choose an employee to hire. Interview them. What can they do for you to assure your future success? You don't have to join an opportunity under the first person who tries to sign you up. Today, savvy opportunity seekers make potential sponsors meet qualifications in the same way they do with the business opportunity itself.

Many MLM companies do generate billions of dollars in annual revenue and hundreds of millions of dollars in annual profit. However, the profits of the MLM company are accrued at the detriment to the majority of the company's constituent workforce (the MLM participants). Only some of said profit is then significantly shared with individual participants at the top of the MLM distributorship pyramid. The earnings of those top few participants is emphasized and championed at company seminars and conferences, thus creating an illusion of how one can potentially become financially successful if they become a participants in the MLM. This is then advertised by the MLM company to recruit more distributors to participate in the MLM with a false anticipation of earning margins which are in reality merely theoretical and statistically improbable.[14]
Networking, as it used to be called, is a pretty thankless task. The conventional approach to networking was to start with the network of friends and colleagues that you already have; friends and family, your existing clients, your contacts at the squash club and so on. Most people feel uncomfortable pitching to friends and family, unless you have an unbeatable idea or concept, but if that was the case, then lead generation would not be a problem
Is Home Depot going to run a class on how to make submarine sandwiches? No. Makes no sense, right? Would people be attracted to that? Like that one I might attend. I like submarine sandwiches, they’re pretty good. That I might attend but I’m going to go there and be like why am I in a building supply company? I’m not going to buy anything. It doesn’t make sense.
Lift Hero is a ridesharing platform designed specifically for elderly passengers. The requirements to become a “Hero” are more extensive than traditional rideshare drivers to ensure extra safety for Lift Hero passengers. For instance, drivers must be CPR and First Aid certified and possess at least 3 years of driving history. To see the full list of driver requirements, click here.
The real selling point for MLMs is that distributors can make money in two different ways. The first is money made from commissions from direct selling to consumers. And the second way to make money with an MLM is from the commissions made from sales of distributors below you in the pyramid (these are sometimes referred to as recruits or downline distributors).
Running a MLM business is more than just being able to get the right company in place. It is about being able to maximize all of the of them that are coming through the door. It is about being able to find those leads and making sure they are not gone until you have their money in hand and they are happy with the product. These tips should assist in putting forth a great actionable plan that is going to results in wonderful leads both now and in the future with equal effect.
Not all MLM companies are created equal. Many see an initial burst of success followed by a gradual tapering off of profits, causing them to collapse and go out of business. MLM companies that succeed have sound business models, both for those who run the company and for those who sell product and recruit new sales agents. There are many sites devoted to MLM rankings, creating lists of companies likely to provide a return on investment to sales agents interested in the industry.
“One of the best sales advice that I truly believe in is you always have to listen to your potential customer and their needs, that way you'll see if your product is a fit for them or not. The ultimate goal of an entrepreneur is to provide solutions to the marketplace. That's why we always have to listen more and speak less. We are given two ears and one mouth for a reason, so we have to use them accordingly.” -  Jelena Ostrovska
It is almost impossible to stop the industry because of the amount of investors and lobbyists who are profiting from them. “During the Obama administration, the Federal Trade Commission made its biggest-ever effort to curb this industry when last summer it slapped nutritional supplement–seller Herbalife with a $200 million fine and, as part of a settlement with Herbalife, demanded it restructure its business so that it would “start operating legitimately,” as FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez put it.” (Slate) The current administration under President Donald Trump will be a completely different story and may very well be a boon for the MLM industry. Let’s start with Trump himself. In 2009, he licensed his name to an MLM, which eventually went bankrupt, along with many of his participants. Many in Trump’s cabinet have strong ties to MLMs as well: Betsey DeVos (whose husband is the president of Amway — by the way, DeVos family has donated $200 million to the Republican party over the years), Ben Carson, Carl Icahn (a billionaire who is also a major investor in Herbalife and holds five board seats at the company), and Charles Herbster.

Other than that, great info, but I’d have to respectfully disagree with the logic behind not being a part of an MLM. It’s one business model. And whether you want to make it your full time job or just dabble, so long as you find a product and company you love, it can be a great way to diversify your income streams. $5000 a year (or $5) is more than most people make on their 401K, savings or any other conventional ways of investing. It’s an investment, and for those that chose to continue through the plateau, it results in residual income. Don’t like sales? Some of the companies are moving away from the door to door type sales models and putting a lot more emphasis on team building and adding value. And many companies are also discouraging distributors from spamming on social media- again- it comes down to the individual and their own business acumen. We can spend our lives blaming they systems or we can just own ourselves and be grateful for whatever we’ve learned from, and created out of each opportunity presented to us. It’s the choice of the individual at the end of the day but one thing I can say with certainty is that someone who blames MLM for their lack of success is lacking responsibility for themselves in other areas of their life too.

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