Don’t just focus on the glowing reviews from distributors who are making $50,000 per month. You should also pay close attention to those people who never made any money and gave up after a few short months. Why did they give up? What are the common complaints from unsuccessful distributors? Answer these questions to gain insights into the MLM you’re considering.
I see Melaleuca on here. I see that as both good and bad. They are an awesome company with a great compensation plan. However, they are not an MLM. They are not even listed with the federal agency that oversees those companies. They are a Consumer Direct Marketing company. How does that differ? While I am required to purchase a certain amount each month, that’s all I need to purchase. It’s all products I use in my own home for myself. I don’t have a monthly quota to meet. I don’t have to buy product and sell it to people. The idea is that the product goes to the consumer only. In fact, it’s against company policy to buy product and sell it to others. The only comparison I see are the “levels” of customerS in my group. Can you shed any light on why you think they are an MLM? Thanks, so much!
There are people out in the industry that will tell you recruiting is Selling, and Selling is Recruiting. They are wrong. Selling is Transaction based, and Recruiting is Transformation based. Selling is a one time event, where Recruiting births many events in the future. Selling is about CLOSING people. Recruiting is about OPENING futures. Don't be misled. They are 2 totally different processes, with different skill sets needed, no matter what some folks say.

But please do a little research before you blanket insult an entire industry or business model. I am a single mother with a 6 figure income because of MLM, nearly twice that when I’m actively working my business with both of the companies I represent, and while not everyone has the skill set to succeed in this business, the potential is certainly there, for those that do.


This is awesome! I didn’t know there was an MLM company that sells wine. I may look into this. I’m still on the search for a solid company. I pretty much have PTSD with MLM companies because of past teams I signed up under. They were all about hype and money but never did explain HOW to build the business. It was so bad that I am now more cautious and aware of these type of people.
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I learned seo and blogging, failed at that. I learned Facebook ads and email marketing, learned how to target the right demographics for Doterra, now people contact me wanting to know about the oils, then I got present and sign up, this my friend’s is the best of both worlds and what everyone should learn, find your form of marketing, go teach and sign up and leave for friends and family alone, unless you know they’ll want it.

Most people who try network marketing fail – not because the products they are marketing are poor, but because they do not realise how much effort network marketing is, and how much time they need to put into it. All too often, would-be marketers give up when they get to the six month point, but they are not quite turning a good profit. What they don’t realise is that if they had waited it out just a few months more, and kept on marketing and expanding their business, then they could have been profitable.


MLM itself is a legitimate business strategy. However the subject of ethics can be rather vulnerable. The pyramid scheme, unlike MLM, is clearly a scam. In a pyramid structure, a member pays a fee to join. A portion of the money will then be remitted back to them when they bring a new member into the scheme. No products are involved in this scheme, simply get more people to dump in money for your chance to make more money.

Your network marketing story, on the other hand, should be the full explanation as to why you are doing what you are doing in the first place. It should tell people who you are (and how that qualifies you to do what you do), how you got started in your network marketing career, why you love what you do, and how your network marketing career has changed your life.
Thanks for this post. Very helpful. I do like direct sales; one reason for this is that it helps keep alive that age-old tradition of people interacting face-to-face (rather than mainly through texting and social media). For that reason, I think MLMs should target the lonely Millennials. Anyway, I was a member/distributor of Advocare for over 10 years and still miss the products and the activities in the company, now that I am temporarily out. I still plan to sign up again when I can afford it (long story–I’ll spare you). I am now involved in Melaleuca, and I must say in their defense that Melaleuca’s products are actually not overpriced. Because Preferred Customers are not only not expected, but also NOT ALLOWED to turn around and sell the products at the retail price, everyone pays the same low prices. (Granted, one can indeed go to the website and buy directly from the company if they do not want to become a Preferred Customer. Why would someone do that when the annual membership is only $19? Only if they do not want to commit to the minimum monthly requirement for Preferred Customers.) Public, keep this in mind! Don’t be fooled by the rebels who are selling old Melaleuca products on Amazon for way above the retail price!! You’re much better off buying fresh products directly from the factory, even if you pay retail price. Just sayin. My big question: What about Tupperware? I have been a Tupperware consultant for about 6 months, and I have found it to be extremely difficult to keep business going. The directors training me have said that Tupperware is the second most widely recognized brand name in the world, second only to Coca-Cola. If that is the case, why is it so hard to find people willing to host Tupperware parties? Why does it seem so hard to sell? Also, is it just me…Or, does Tupperware’s compensation plan stink?

I see Melaleuca on here. I see that as both good and bad. They are an awesome company with a great compensation plan. However, they are not an MLM. They are not even listed with the federal agency that oversees those companies. They are a Consumer Direct Marketing company. How does that differ? While I am required to purchase a certain amount each month, that’s all I need to purchase. It’s all products I use in my own home for myself. I don’t have a monthly quota to meet. I don’t have to buy product and sell it to people. The idea is that the product goes to the consumer only. In fact, it’s against company policy to buy product and sell it to others. The only comparison I see are the “levels” of customerS in my group. Can you shed any light on why you think they are an MLM? Thanks, so much!


Plexus Worlwide is ranked by Inc. magazine as #8 (in 2014) and #132 (in 2015) fastest growing privately held company with a three year growth of 2833%; all while offering a 60-day money back guarantee on all its products – which means the products work. And at a consumer friendly price point. 40% of all sales are from customers and not ambassadors.
An issue in determining the legitimacy of a multi-level marketing company is whether it sells its products primarily to consumers or to its members who must recruit new members to buy their products. If it is the former, the company is a legitimate multi-level marketer. If it is the latter, it could be an illegal pyramid scheme. The Federal Trade Commission has been investigating multi-level marketing companies for several decades and has found many that blur the lines between the two. According to industry data, there are 90 million members worldwide, but relatively few earn meaningful income from their efforts. To some observers, that reflects the characteristics of a pyramid scheme.
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Kay, you don’t need a lot of money to buy essential oils, NOT AT ALL! Specifically now that distillers will sell directly to small businesses with very minimum amount, your $100 will buy you a lot actually. Averagely, your cost with MLM in a single bottle will be around 25x-30x more. So it is not the cost; but the business set-up (packaging, presentation, etc.).
I joined in the mid-90’s under a Dr that paid my way. We were somewhere in Paul Orberson’s dowline, below an AR kid making $80K+/month. I didn’t actually sign anyone as a rep, and just enjoyed doing the pitch to the crowd in the hotels, restaurants, and eventually auditoriums. I got paid by the Dr to tell the “long distance” story, and he went all the way to there top tier in under a year.
Email Autoresponder – Your lead capture page webform should feed an email autoresponder. When a prospect completes and submits the webform, they should be subscribed to your email autoresponder. The email autoresponder should then send out personalized email messages to the prospect on your behalf. At the same time, the email autoresponder should send you an email notification of the new lead that was just generated.
While MLM patriarchs may cry hoarse on the many advantages of an MLM business, it is always a great idea to look out for the red flags. Not every Multilevel Marketing venture turns out to be an ‘Amway’, & it is best to remain cognizant of the problems typically faced by business owners. Right from poor support & services, data insecurity, inadequate business intelligence, lack of industrial knowledge to the obstacles stacked up when choosing an allied technology partner this is no smooth ride.
Many people are scared away from network marketing, also known as multi-level marketing (MLM), because of all the myths and misunderstanding about this type of business. Part of negativity comes from reported low MLM success rates. However, a multi-level marketing business isn't destined to fail any more than any other business. Regardless of the home business you start, success comes from doing the work to build it. 
People today want to be understood. They wan to feel like they matter. And the greatest 2 words you can say, are "I understand." Agree with them in part, by jumping over to their side of the fence, and seeing it from their perspective. You may not totally agree with their view, but you can understand it, and that will go a long way to connecting you to that prospect. Understand first, then take a stand second, with that in mind.
You must select a mentor you respect who has a history of success. If you were an employer hiring a new employee, would you be skeptical of someone who was a job hopper? Make sure your mentor is not an MLM junkie. Look for someone who believes in career MLM opportunities. To consistently earn the type of income you dream about, you must find a solid company, build a loyal distributorship and customer organization, and resist the impulse to jump on every hot new deal. Too many hot deals that fail will simply waste your time and money and leave you cold.
Q: I'm new to MLM but with a good company with a long history of success. I'm confused and a little overwhelmed by the complexities of the business. We have hundreds of products, catalogs of training tapes and videos, and a big Web site where my customers can order products. There seem to be a million ways to build a business. I don't know where to start. What do you suggest?
And the reason is LEVERAGE… or being able to manipulate other people’s effort and time for your own gain. With MLM, the same principle applies. Everyone has the opportunity to become their own boss and has the opportunity to leverage their time and effort to an infinite extent of people down the line, while giving the opportunity for everyone to make money.
Many companies will tell you to make a list of 100 people you know when you’re getting started. There’s nothing wrong with that, but most successful MLM marketers have very few clients that are from that original list. In most cases, the family and friends only come on when they see your success. You need to treat MLM just like any other business in the sense that you only focus on the people who are interested in what you’re offering. You need to have a target market.
Making friends and build relations with people is too important in the network marketing business, it helps you to understand people’s psychology and mentality. Join groups and start to talk with people, share your hobbies and make relationships with them. You can also make a profile on social media like twitter, linked in, facebook and start to communicate and makes your relationship with them.
By theory, the MLM mode of operation is simply more cost efficient and easier to run. However the recruitment of sales agents revolve largely around the idea of hitting the jackpot of financial freedom. Simple math will tell you that most people will obviously not make it big through MLM. A certain individual even goes as far to say that 99% of people don’t ever make a profit during his interview with CNBC.
To start, pick out a product or two that you feel good about. Then select two to three proven sales methods from your training materials. Concentrate on these methods, avoiding the temptation to expand. In other words, "narrowcast" rather than "broadcast" your efforts. Do the same with your sponsoring methods: Pick two concepts you're comfortable with and focus on these.
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First, Elliot, thank you for this article. Your sense of truly wanting to help comes through and it’s refreshing. Like MommyFinance, I too have suffered PTSD from previous runs at MLM but I have been looking for legitimate ways of making extra income and seems I’m being directed toward trying MLM again. Your article gave me hope that there are some good ones out there. What you said about finding the one that fits me and leaving a legacy for family really turned on a light for me and I greatly appreciate that. A wine business is not quite up my alley but I will certainly direct those who might be interested your way.
I agree with you that much of the industry is flawed, but what about an MLM that has a service rather than a product such as electricity. It’s not like that could go out of style or that once you buy it you don’t need it again or that your monthly supply is too much and you’re going to stop the monthly subscriptions. I can honestly say that I cannot stand most MLM companies because regardless what you believe or how much you like the product, if you have to try to convince someone else to use it then inevitably the system is flawed and eventually your residuals will dry up. Electricity though, that’s different in my opinion, no one has to convince me to use it, it just comes by default. Find me an MLM that is not selling so much as showing someone an alternative to what they already have to pay and I’d be interested.
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