I see Melaleuca on here. I see that as both good and bad. They are an awesome company with a great compensation plan. However, they are not an MLM. They are not even listed with the federal agency that oversees those companies. They are a Consumer Direct Marketing company. How does that differ? While I am required to purchase a certain amount each month, that’s all I need to purchase. It’s all products I use in my own home for myself. I don’t have a monthly quota to meet. I don’t have to buy product and sell it to people. The idea is that the product goes to the consumer only. In fact, it’s against company policy to buy product and sell it to others. The only comparison I see are the “levels” of customerS in my group. Can you shed any light on why you think they are an MLM? Thanks, so much!
AllApp DevelopmentBloggingBusiness OpportunitiesBusiness SpotlightsConsultingEcommerceBuilding Traffice-BizeBayHow-To GuidesInternet MarketingSearch Engine OptimizationSite ManagementSocial MediaWeb Site DesignFranchisesFreelance WorkGig EconomyGo GreenHow-To GuidesLow-Cost BusinessesMail OrderNetwork MarketingPublishingReal EstateRetirementSecuritySEOSpecial TypesSuccess Stories

"We have been using National-Leads.com since the end of March, 2007 and recommending them to our team. We are very pleased with the conversion from the 1-7 day old email leads and the price is affordable for everyone. We use them with an autoresponder and once they sign up for our free offer, follow up with them. We are delighted to discover they are very qualified MLM leads with people eager to get their business started. The support with National Leads is phenomenal. They offer training and tips for good tools we can use with our businesses. The owner is funny, very personable and has a great heart for people. Take our word for it, this is the kind of home business leads company you want to make a part of your advertising budget."
As non-employees, participants are not protected by legal rights of employment law provisions. Instead, salespeople are typically presented by the MLM company as "independent contractors" or "independent business owners". However, participants do not possess a business in the traditional legal sense, as the participants do not hold any tangible business assets or intangible business goodwill able to be sold or purchased in a sale or acquisition of a business. These are the property of the MLM company.
Don’t just focus on the glowing reviews from distributors who are making $50,000 per month. You should also pay close attention to those people who never made any money and gave up after a few short months. Why did they give up? What are the common complaints from unsuccessful distributors? Answer these questions to gain insights into the MLM you’re considering.
A 2018 poll of 1,049 MLM sellers across various companies found that most sellers make less than the equivalent of 70 cents an hour. Nearly 20 percent of those polled never made a sale, and nearly 60 percent earned less than $500 in sales over the past five years.[42][43] Nearly 32 percent of those polled acquired credit card debt to finance their MLM involvement.[44]
Make a decision that you will master this and not give up. Make up your mind to learn and develop the skills to be able to recruit. Make up your mind to pass your fear of talking to people and come out of your shell. Your decisions should be bigger than your fears and insecurities. Even if you are an introvert, make up your mind to make it a priority and do it whenever you choose.
×