Hey Rob, oh no. Definitely don’t have buyer’s remorse. Look at it as an opportunity for open doors. When I started network marketing I began to understand how to sell a product and then found other opportunities which lead me to where I am now. So I am always grateful for having found network marketing and getting started because I would not have been where I am now. I hope that my blog is helpful and that you can learn something.
Here's my best advice: Find a mentor. While your mentor may be your direct sponsor or part of your upline, he or she may also be an independent advisor who's in no way connected with your MLM company. Some, such as a consultant, may charge you a small fee and help you evaluate various business opportunities in order to select the right one for your special talents. Others may mentor you for free and possibly guide you to opportunities they feel good about. It's part of their job to earn your confidence and respect. You may choose to be sponsored by them in one of their favorite companies, but don't feel obligated. Don't forget to check their references and dig into their credentials.
In April 2006, the FTC proposed a Business Opportunity Rule intended to require all sellers of business opportunities—including MLMs—to provide enough information to enable prospective buyers/participants to make an informed decision about acquiring/joining a business venture with information disclosed about the average likelihood of monetary profitability (and the extent of monetary profitability, if any) of acquiring/joining the business venture. In March 2008, however, the FTC removed "Network Marketing" (i.e. MLM) companies from the proposed Business Opportunity Rule, thus leaving MLM participants without the ability to make an informed choice of entering or not entering MLMs based on the disclosed likelihood of success and profitability:
So the bigger your network, the larger will be the sales thus big commissions every week or month. Best part is passive income/residual income. Once you have a big team you get commission from sale made by people u dont even know because they were referred by some 100th guy but u still make money for that sale although your effort was nothing in it. It may sound easy but creating and training  your network takes a lot of time and efforts. THIS IS NOT A GET RICH QUICK SCHEME !!  But if you work hard you can earn money in short period of time u would never earn in jobs.
I just started selling for one of the top 15 and I went in knowing that this was just supplemental cash and nothing that would support my family. I spend 15 minutes (mostly from my phone) a day on my business and am happy with what I’ve done thus far. If it covers groceries and some extras like clothes or shoes, I’m good. If I start to become even more successful, great. It’s my competitive nature to want to out rank others, so I find it to be more of a personal challenge than thinking I’m going to get rich and stay rich. I appreciate the article and the no BS attitude.
On a side note, I started using doTERRA about five years ago and love the oils! I didn’t join them to sell, or make money. I just wanted to raise awareness in what they could do and help with for individuals and families, as they did me and mine. In fact, many of my friends are now distributors (not under me). Lost opportunities? Not at all, in my book. More power to them! Back to R + F, and a little more insight from you would certainly scratch an itch.
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Recruitment is an integral part of any MLM, but it doesn’t need to be the focus. Whenever MLMs charge high startup fees, require high recruitment for a commission, do not provide sales training, or otherwise value recruitment over product, that’s a clue that it is not a good MLM to join. Network marketing companies should rely on networks to sell products, instead of only recruiting your network.
I agree with you that much of the industry is flawed, but what about an MLM that has a service rather than a product such as electricity. It’s not like that could go out of style or that once you buy it you don’t need it again or that your monthly supply is too much and you’re going to stop the monthly subscriptions. I can honestly say that I cannot stand most MLM companies because regardless what you believe or how much you like the product, if you have to try to convince someone else to use it then inevitably the system is flawed and eventually your residuals will dry up. Electricity though, that’s different in my opinion, no one has to convince me to use it, it just comes by default. Find me an MLM that is not selling so much as showing someone an alternative to what they already have to pay and I’d be interested.
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