Kay, you don’t need a lot of money to buy essential oils, NOT AT ALL! Specifically now that distillers will sell directly to small businesses with very minimum amount, your $100 will buy you a lot actually. Averagely, your cost with MLM in a single bottle will be around 25x-30x more. So it is not the cost; but the business set-up (packaging, presentation, etc.).

Thanks for this post. Very helpful. I do like direct sales; one reason for this is that it helps keep alive that age-old tradition of people interacting face-to-face (rather than mainly through texting and social media). For that reason, I think MLMs should target the lonely Millennials. Anyway, I was a member/distributor of Advocare for over 10 years and still miss the products and the activities in the company, now that I am temporarily out. I still plan to sign up again when I can afford it (long story–I’ll spare you). I am now involved in Melaleuca, and I must say in their defense that Melaleuca’s products are actually not overpriced. Because Preferred Customers are not only not expected, but also NOT ALLOWED to turn around and sell the products at the retail price, everyone pays the same low prices. (Granted, one can indeed go to the website and buy directly from the company if they do not want to become a Preferred Customer. Why would someone do that when the annual membership is only $19? Only if they do not want to commit to the minimum monthly requirement for Preferred Customers.) Public, keep this in mind! Don’t be fooled by the rebels who are selling old Melaleuca products on Amazon for way above the retail price!! You’re much better off buying fresh products directly from the factory, even if you pay retail price. Just sayin. My big question: What about Tupperware? I have been a Tupperware consultant for about 6 months, and I have found it to be extremely difficult to keep business going. The directors training me have said that Tupperware is the second most widely recognized brand name in the world, second only to Coca-Cola. If that is the case, why is it so hard to find people willing to host Tupperware parties? Why does it seem so hard to sell? Also, is it just me…Or, does Tupperware’s compensation plan stink?

For some reason, many people don't view their MLM business as a business, like they would if they opened a franchise or started a business from scratch. One of the most important things you can do to insure your success is to treat your MLM venture as the business it is. Here are a few other tips to help you improve your multi-level marketing (MLM) and recruiting efforts within the world of direct selling:
Thank you for your article. I am also with doterra and I never in my life thought I would do something like this. The reason I started was because of health issues that led me to the oils. I have been an RN for 23 years and I feel more free and excited to share about health than ever. If you are going into something to get rich quick, I think that is the wrong attitude. I think most of my fellow doterra wellness advocates, have come to the same realization as me. I believe most of us started out trying to help ourselves and our families. I left my nursing job of 17 years in Feb, not because I am making enough money to replace my past income, but because I truly love helping others and I love the company and what it stands for. I can’t argue about MLM’s because I truly don’t care about that side of it. Maybe I am wrong to think that way. I hope that this ride doesn’t end anytime soon because the difference that doterra is making in my life, and the lives of those around me, is amazing. Thank you again for your information and your viewpoint.
The benefits of an Multilevel Marketing business are primarily that you invest practically limited capital, & minimal working hours. Also with a prevalence of great products people are inclined to get attracted to what you sell. One of the best part of an MLM business remains that it gives you the chance to enjoy residual income. The way a Multilevel Marketing program is designed, is the more customers you get recruited under you, the more your chances of earning.
Before approaching the prospects, you need to target your audience. One of the biggest mistakes new MLMers make is looking at everyone as a potential customer. This is an area where the MLM  industry gets wrong. Like any other business, you’re going to have greater success and efficiency if you identify your target market or audience and focus your marketing efforts at them.
I was at “Sweetness Bakery and Cafe” the other day to order a hot chocolate with a friend. The barista asked me if I wanted half & half, whole milk, soy, rice, or hemp milk. I had never tasted hemp milk before. And I remembered the transition soy went through when manufacturers started sweetening soy up. So, I decided to try hemp since I figured it was sweet enough or the cafe wouldn’t suggest it. And Oh My God! It was the best cup of hot chocolate EVER! And I was amazed at what can be done with hemp.

“One of the best sales advice that I truly believe in is you always have to listen to your potential customer and their needs, that way you'll see if your product is a fit for them or not. The ultimate goal of an entrepreneur is to provide solutions to the marketplace. That's why we always have to listen more and speak less. We are given two ears and one mouth for a reason, so we have to use them accordingly.” -  Jelena Ostrovska
Kay, you don’t need a lot of money to buy essential oils, NOT AT ALL! Specifically now that distillers will sell directly to small businesses with very minimum amount, your $100 will buy you a lot actually. Averagely, your cost with MLM in a single bottle will be around 25x-30x more. So it is not the cost; but the business set-up (packaging, presentation, etc.).
Here is how they mostly work: You sign up and pay the buy-in fee to receive your startup kit, and then you start clogging everyone’s social media feeds about your new venture and beg your friends and family to join you on your “journey to financial success”. You host a bunch of fake parties and wine tastings or worse, you meet up one-on-one to catch up and the whole thing turns out to be nothing more than a demo and sales pitch where you guilt your friends into buying stuff they don’t want or need. After you subject them to that, you then try to recruit them to join your team of consultants, or whatever term your particular MLM uses.

Obviously, you don’t have to steal their resources, you don’t have to deprive them of something that makes them better. In fact, to become successful with MLM system and build a fortune, it is your role to empower everyone in your network to make them become successful. The more succesful people you’ve created, the greater you become and the more you’ll get paid.

So to make it possible, you structured a kind of “payplan” or ways how you are going to pay your neigbors and relatives based on the number of people they’ve brought in or the group sales they’ve made. And by applying some MLM principle, you were able to plot a system that traces all sales from person to person down the line. Therefore, giving credit and commission also to the first person who initiated the effort.
I joined in the mid-90’s under a Dr that paid my way. We were somewhere in Paul Orberson’s dowline, below an AR kid making $80K+/month. I didn’t actually sign anyone as a rep, and just enjoyed doing the pitch to the crowd in the hotels, restaurants, and eventually auditoriums. I got paid by the Dr to tell the “long distance” story, and he went all the way to there top tier in under a year.
Independent non-salaried participants, referred to as distributors (variously called "associates", "independent business owners", "independent agents", etc.), are authorized to distribute the company's products or services. They are awarded their own immediate retail profit from customers plus commission from the company, not downlines, through a multi-level marketing compensation plan, which is based upon the volume of products sold through their own sales efforts as well as that of their downline organization.
As a Postmate, you may deliver food from a restaurant, a Frappuccino from Starbucks, or someone’s dry cleaning. Set your own schedule and earn up to $25/hour. To work, you must be over 18 and own a bike, car, truck, scooter, or motorcycle. Postmates receive 80% of the delivery fee and 100% of any tips they make; money is deposited into couriers’ accounts weekly.
At the other end of the spectrum is buying leads. This is also not the best option since it can be very expensive and may result in leads that may not actually be interested in your products or business. These are not great leads, either. The best leads will always be the ones you generate yourself—people who have shown some sort of interest in what you have to offer.

A few people do make big money from MLMs. And these people are often trotted out in promotional videos, celebrated at annual events, and very publicly ‘rewarded’ with prizes like prestigious cars (although these ‘prizes’ aren’t as generous as they first appear – you simply get a discount on the lease which you must take out in your own name, and if your sales fall, the discount ends…). You also need to promote the company on the car they ‘give’ you.

If you insist on trying one of these MLM offers, the least you can do is look for proper business registration with BBB, toll free number, and proper address (no Post Office box). Also, you will need lots of family and friends to make it work. As a final step, check the MLM materials for one or more of these "red flags" that are associated with the worst of the offerings:
80. The MLM presenter many times gets out the dump truck, backs it up to the prospect, and then unloads a TON of information on them. NOT! The prospect is NOT a landfill. Present the information one bite size piece at a time, and give them a chance to digest it. Too much info will turn the prospect off. And they will be thinking, "Do I have to learn ALL THIS?"
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