Thanks for this post. Very helpful. I do like direct sales; one reason for this is that it helps keep alive that age-old tradition of people interacting face-to-face (rather than mainly through texting and social media). For that reason, I think MLMs should target the lonely Millennials. Anyway, I was a member/distributor of Advocare for over 10 years and still miss the products and the activities in the company, now that I am temporarily out. I still plan to sign up again when I can afford it (long story–I’ll spare you). I am now involved in Melaleuca, and I must say in their defense that Melaleuca’s products are actually not overpriced. Because Preferred Customers are not only not expected, but also NOT ALLOWED to turn around and sell the products at the retail price, everyone pays the same low prices. (Granted, one can indeed go to the website and buy directly from the company if they do not want to become a Preferred Customer. Why would someone do that when the annual membership is only $19? Only if they do not want to commit to the minimum monthly requirement for Preferred Customers.) Public, keep this in mind! Don’t be fooled by the rebels who are selling old Melaleuca products on Amazon for way above the retail price!! You’re much better off buying fresh products directly from the factory, even if you pay retail price. Just sayin. My big question: What about Tupperware? I have been a Tupperware consultant for about 6 months, and I have found it to be extremely difficult to keep business going. The directors training me have said that Tupperware is the second most widely recognized brand name in the world, second only to Coca-Cola. If that is the case, why is it so hard to find people willing to host Tupperware parties? Why does it seem so hard to sell? Also, is it just me…Or, does Tupperware’s compensation plan stink?
You absolutely need to set boundaries or you’re going to get burned out before you ever discover your true potential. What does this look like? Maybe you limit yourself to spending one weeknight and one weekend morning on your business. Sure, there will be exceptions, but you need to schedule in time where you’re not in “business mode” so you can enjoy hobbies, self care, and of course, your loved ones without your mind being elsewhere.
On a side note, I started using doTERRA about five years ago and love the oils! I didn’t join them to sell, or make money. I just wanted to raise awareness in what they could do and help with for individuals and families, as they did me and mine. In fact, many of my friends are now distributors (not under me). Lost opportunities? Not at all, in my book. More power to them! Back to R + F, and a little more insight from you would certainly scratch an itch.
2. Show More People. Having a bad day? Show more people. Tires flat? Show more people. Not feeling good about your current results? Show more people. Spouse doesn’t believe in you? Show more people. SMP, SMP, SMP, SMP will pull you out of ANY funk, help you with ANY circumstance and is the ONLY way to actually change your results. Keep in mind it is your habits that created your results so change those habits and…SHOW MORE PEOPLE!

A downline distributor is a recruited distributor from whom the sponsor (the one who recruited them) gains commissions. Every compensation plan involves recruiting other distributors to help sell the company’s product. Some compensation plans provide higher commissions for recruiting successful distributors (quality over quantity). Other plans only focus on simply hiring more distributors (quantity over quality). Overall, downline distributors help sponsors gain extra commissions.
If you build a motivated sales team, you could potentially earn a substantial amount of residual income, which means more free time to grow your business. MLM leverages the power of "word of mouth" to reach consumers. A good product in the hands of a motivated sales team may spread to family members, friends and neighbors rather quickly. In addition, your overhead cost may be minimal under a MLM structure. You may operate as a home-based business, using your own space for storing the product. Much of your operating expenses go toward paying commissions to salespeople, but since this is a variable cost, you only pay when a person completes a sale.
I recently spoke with San Diego based, Vicki Martin, about her experience with Rodan + Fields. Here's her take on her home business and why the opportunity was so appealing for her and her family, "The decision to join Rodan + Fields Dermatologists came easily. Since 2008 the construction industry [which I was previously in] has been hit hard by our economic downturn and my income has been greatly affected. We were working harder for less like many of our friends. Being part of Rodan + Fields Dermatologists is allowing me to work with highly educated people who share a passion for business and for teamwork. Building a recurring, residual income that grows month over month is going to give my husband and I the peace of mind and financial freedom that is so vitally important to our future. My skin looks better than ever. And, I get to work my job around the rest of my life instead of the other way around."
A company that cares more about recruitment than it does about selling products will not invest much in training resources for its distributors. Pyramid schemes are designated as such by their focus on leveraging your network to buy their products through recruitment, under the guise of “startup costs” and “startup packages.” Extensive training programs that focus on teaching you how to sell products instead of how to recruit more will be an important clue in your research.
You apparently have an image strongly planted in your mind of what network marketing (also known as multilevel marketing) is all about housewives buying and selling goods while gossiping or a high-pressure salesperson trying to persuade you they how easily you can become a millionaire if only you and your friends and their friends and so on would buy and sell goods with him.

Running a MLM business is more than just being able to get the right company in place. It is about being able to maximize all of the of them that are coming through the door. It is about being able to find those leads and making sure they are not gone until you have their money in hand and they are happy with the product. These tips should assist in putting forth a great actionable plan that is going to results in wonderful leads both now and in the future with equal effect.
If 18,000,000 Americans consider MLM their careers, yet only 0.3% actually succeed beyond average corporate America wages, do people realize that means there are barely more than 50,000 Americans “living the MLM dream” and almost 17,950,000 who just help the 50,000? Sad. I was part of team Tupperware decades ago because I wanted to buy Tupperware for my home for less. It took me about 14 months as a stay at home mother (never recruited, never pressured, my distributor didn’t like my attitude) to accomplish that task and then walked away. I live in rural America where so many fall to MLMs attempting to climb out of paycheck to paycheck living (very few good jobs) like the saved into a baptismal pool. “Disciples” is the perfect word. MLMs are just not thriving here. How many Americans can one recruit/sell to for building a business in a rural county with less than 20,000 other Americans of which 75% live below the poverty line? I see MLM victims everywhere.
Thanks for this post. Very helpful. I do like direct sales; one reason for this is that it helps keep alive that age-old tradition of people interacting face-to-face (rather than mainly through texting and social media). For that reason, I think MLMs should target the lonely Millennials. Anyway, I was a member/distributor of Advocare for over 10 years and still miss the products and the activities in the company, now that I am temporarily out. I still plan to sign up again when I can afford it (long story–I’ll spare you). I am now involved in Melaleuca, and I must say in their defense that Melaleuca’s products are actually not overpriced. Because Preferred Customers are not only not expected, but also NOT ALLOWED to turn around and sell the products at the retail price, everyone pays the same low prices. (Granted, one can indeed go to the website and buy directly from the company if they do not want to become a Preferred Customer. Why would someone do that when the annual membership is only $19? Only if they do not want to commit to the minimum monthly requirement for Preferred Customers.) Public, keep this in mind! Don’t be fooled by the rebels who are selling old Melaleuca products on Amazon for way above the retail price!! You’re much better off buying fresh products directly from the factory, even if you pay retail price. Just sayin. My big question: What about Tupperware? I have been a Tupperware consultant for about 6 months, and I have found it to be extremely difficult to keep business going. The directors training me have said that Tupperware is the second most widely recognized brand name in the world, second only to Coca-Cola. If that is the case, why is it so hard to find people willing to host Tupperware parties? Why does it seem so hard to sell? Also, is it just me…Or, does Tupperware’s compensation plan stink?
Appreciate the hard work studying this… Im apart of the #1 company on there Advocare… have been for 7 years and one of the higher paid single guys in the nation… I just have to disagree with “over priced Products” comment. There is a mark up on every product in the world… Our products actually work which is why those endorsers you mentioned turn down high level incomes with other companies to endorse us for a stipend of products per month. Advocare has numerous people making a great profit and even more just enjoying a product they would pay double what they do for to feel the way they do. Success rate isnt low my friend… Its just the quit rate is through the roof. Highly recommend everyone seeing this and you sir to watch “Rise of the Entrepreneur” by Eric Worre on Itunes to get some serious facts about the MLM industry. Thanks for all the research and blessings!
Now that people are jumping on board the MLM business train, I find many are searching for the best ways to build their business. Many leaders offer MLM tips and, but I have something extra special for you today… You see, many of those leaders only give you at the most 10 MLM tips. And some of the tips they provide will only work for certain MLM businesses. The tips I am going to give you will work for any and all MLM businesses.
The first thing you need to do is protect yourself from pyramid schemes masquerading as MLM ventures. You should arm yourself with knowledge about the direct sales industry and MLM companies in general. Moreover, you need to vet your sponsor to find out if they’re a good match for you. Yes, you can make money in MLM. However, the statistics show that less than 1 percent of MLM representatives actually achieve success in their MLM business. That doesn’t necessarily mean that MLM businesses are broken. Just look at the world of athletics for example. Most athletes never make it to the Olympics. Does that mean that the Olympics are broken?
Melaleuca, Inc. is listed as a Direct Marketing Company. The company contracts with independent marketing executives who refer customers to Melaleuca that purchase its various lines of nutritional, pharmaceutical, personal care, household cleaning, and pet care products. They also offer travel, phone and credit card services. Customers receive discounts if they order a minimum monthly product supply, but are not required to maintain an inventory of products. The company states that it offers a “Satisfaction or Money Back Guarantee”.
One of the greatest pitfalls most network marketers fall into is the lure of huge potential income from an MLM business. Therefore, they end up not paying enough attention to what the company is asking them to sell. In MLM, as in any other industry, you can’t sell something effectively that you aren’t proud of. You won’t be enthusiastic about it, and potential customers will be able to smell that lack of enthusiasm from a mile away.
The Direct Selling Association (DSA), a lobbying group for the MLM industry, reported that in 1990 only 25% of DSA members used the MLM business model. By 1999, this had grown to 77.3%.[26] By 2009, 94.2% of DSA members were using MLM, accounting for 99.6% of sellers, and 97.1% of sales.[27] Companies such as Avon, Electrolux, Tupperware,[28] and Kirby were all originally single-level marketing companies, using that traditional and uncontroversial direct selling business model (distinct from MLM) to sell their goods. However, they later introduced multi-level compensation plans, becoming MLMs.[23] The DSA has approximately 200 members[29] while it is estimated there are over 1,000 firms using multi-level marketing in the United States alone.[30]

Succeeding in any business in our fast paced world takes hard work and a solid business plan. One of the biggest mistake most new business owners make when entering any new business venture is they are under the impression it will be easy. This is especially true when it comes to a multi level marketing (MLM) business. Although it will be hard work there are keys to success and these MLM tips should help you get well on your way to being successful.
Talking and selling can be challenging, and the only way you can understand your prospects needs and wants is to ask questions. Many marketers do not listen and ask the right question. They are more focused on talking about their compensation plan, products and services and how their company is excellent than asking their prospects the right questions.
To stay safe from pyramid schemes and MLM scams, arm yourself with knowledge. Learn about the direct sales industry as a whole, research MLM companies carefully, and determine if you're a good match with your sponsor. The truth is, while you can get rich in MLM, statistics show that less than one out of 100 MLM representatives actually achieve MLM success or make any money. However, that's not necessarily the MLM business' fault. Most athletes never make it to the Olympics, but that's not sport's or the Olympics' fault.
Hey Erica, I’m a doterra gal also. Just over 3 years ago I just wanted to see if these hippie oils really worked from there I couldn’t keep my mouth shut and I share with whomever will listen. I recently read this in the leadership magazine and I love it. “An oil for every household, a drop to change a life”. That is my goal. I never plan to get rich off my sharing but if I can change a life, help someone along the way it will be worth my time.
EatWith is a platform for home-restaurants and unique food experiences. EatWith chefs prepare innovative meals and host local foodies in their homes. Whether you are a Michelin-starred chef or a self-taught home cook, EatWith allows you to showcase your cooking chops to an ever-rotating roster of guests from in and out of town. Host a pop-up or cater a private event. Have fun making creative, delicious meals.
Develop a referral program. Just like in other businesses, people who are referred by others are easier to convert to a sale than people who weren't, because they're usually coming to you with some interest in buying. Many people you talk to won't be interested in buying right away, but they might know people who are. Happy customers may want to share your product or business. You can develop a referral program to give people incentive to refer others to you. For example, you can give them a 10 percent discount on their next purchase for every new customer they refer. 
In Network Marketing you have to get eyeballs on your presentation, whatever that looks like. It could be a DVD, online video, home meeting, sizzle call, etc. You simply have to ask people to check out the tool to see if it is something that have openness to. Every other aspect of network marketing training is really to keep you doing just that and trainers understand all the mental garbage that goes along with rejection and having people tell you no. I think everyone should experience a super high rejection job prior to coming into network marketing to prepare them. Let me explain…
Great tips Ray, and you came from the Real Estate industry and anybody who is successful in Real Estate is usually much more successful in Network Marketing as a Career, because Real Estate is Networking and Marketing so it's a natural transition and so again, you were already a very accomplished professional in the industry and didn't even know it until you got in it! LOL! So, yes, Ray is right again, (dang, do I really have to admit that! :)) And again, this advice isn't new but process or lack thereof is what most don't master, and I even have some sticky spots, at times, but process and processes must be mastered like you said Ray, and being able to make a sale (no matter how simple it may be to do as a process) is hard for most people because there is always a little tension at that time and just because of that few minutes or so of being kinda uncomfortable while wrapping it up as they say, most people live all or most of their lives afraid of this one unavoidable instance, and throw their future to the wind or out the window. One of the two. 🙂 With that, make it a great weekend and Good Day! HF. PS. Oh, last thought, a women and her husband (the Hodges) were in Real Estate, and still are, and have made millions in this industry from what I found out, since they are working with myself and the VP of the Co I'm with. So people in your industry Ray that see the light in the Network Marketing industry that are savvy usually crush it to use a way worn out pun! Chaio. HF
Business Presentation – Once the prospect completes your lead capture page webform and hits the “submit” button, their browser should be redirected to your business presentation. That way they’re getting all the information about your business right away even before you talk to them. That makes your prospecting job easier when you contact them because they’ve ideally already viewed the information. The URL of the business presentation is typically programmed into the lead capture page webform.

The Federal Trade Commission issued a decision, In re Amway Corp., in 1979 in which it indicated that multi-level marketing was not illegal per se in the United States. However, Amway was found guilty of price fixing (by effectively requiring "independent" distributors to sell at the same fixed price) and making exaggerated income claims.[47][48] The FTC advises that multi-level marketing organizations with greater incentives for recruitment than product sales are to be viewed skeptically. The FTC also warns that the practice of getting commissions from recruiting new members is outlawed in most states as "pyramiding".[49]

Is Home Depot going to run a class on how to make submarine sandwiches? No. Makes no sense, right? Would people be attracted to that? Like that one I might attend. I like submarine sandwiches, they’re pretty good. That I might attend but I’m going to go there and be like why am I in a building supply company? I’m not going to buy anything. It doesn’t make sense.
To get to the point… one important way to build trust from your readers would be to provide value-based content that your audience can benefit from. Providing this worthwhile information will create a spellbinding magnetism causing your audience to develop a thirst for more. This action alone will build trust and in turn your readers will begin to like you and look up to you as an authority in your niche.
×