The legal distinction between MLMs and traditional pyramid schemes has been characterized by many authorities as a legal fiction. Jurisdictions that retain a legal distinction between MLM pyramid businesses versus illegal pyramid schemes retain said distinction on two key distinguishing features: 1) that MLMs always encompass the sale of actual products/services, while traditional illegal pyramid schemes ordinarily do not (though sometimes they do), and 2) that climbing an MLM pyramid is overwhelmingly statistically improbable (especially to its highest participant levels) but not theoretically impossible, whereas climbing a traditional illegal pyramid scheme is both statistically and theoretically impossible.[citation needed]


The prospect of working from home is becoming increasingly popular. According to The New York Times, a recent Gallup poll reports 43 percent of employees work remotely some of the time. Of those, the number working from home four to five days per week has jumped to 31 percent. Modern workers seem to be embracing the flexibility of working remotely, so it’s not surprising that multi-level marketing companies (MLMs) are “poised for explosive growth,” Forbes predicts.
The Federal Trade Commission issued a decision, In re Amway Corp., in 1979 in which it indicated that multi-level marketing was not illegal per se in the United States. However, Amway was found guilty of price fixing (by effectively requiring "independent" distributors to sell at the same fixed price) and making exaggerated income claims.[47][48] The FTC advises that multi-level marketing organizations with greater incentives for recruitment than product sales are to be viewed skeptically. The FTC also warns that the practice of getting commissions from recruiting new members is outlawed in most states as "pyramiding".[49]
Remember that networking can happen anywhere. It’s just a matter of determining where the best places are to find your potential customers and sales recruits. If you sell a health product, then any place people go who want to become more healthy – gyms, sports clubs, hiking hotspots, etc. – are options that you can turn into networking opportunities.
Is Home Depot going to run a class on how to make submarine sandwiches? No. Makes no sense, right? Would people be attracted to that? Like that one I might attend. I like submarine sandwiches, they’re pretty good. That I might attend but I’m going to go there and be like why am I in a building supply company? I’m not going to buy anything. It doesn’t make sense.

I thought this article was fantastic. I currently work with an MLM and love it, but I definitely can see why MLM’s would have flaws. However, I also know for me it wasn’t about selling as much as it was SHARING. I have experienced more than a product, I have been able to share the gift of health and the gift of the business itself. I absolutely love it and people who join me in this mission are as passionate as well! I believe when we look at really loving people where they are and actually caring, success will come and not the other way around. That’s the only way I’ve been able to see it happen! Any who, thanks for the tips!

However, as aforementioned, you may know people that sell products from Mary Kay, Avon, Advocare, Tupperware and the like (see more companies in our Featured Home Businesses section). You know people who sell these types of products because they believe in the products and the companies that stand behind them. These companies empower those who sell their products to actually establish their own businesses, selling the products. This is very attractive to many entrepreneurial-minded people who do not want to have a boss watching over them but also want some pre-established structure and support. Most MLM organizations provide a very robust infrastructure and great training as well as impeccable rewards (hello free cars and trips!).
Many MLM companies do generate billions of dollars in annual revenue and hundreds of millions of dollars in annual profit. However, the profits of the MLM company are accrued at the detriment to the majority of the company's constituent workforce (the MLM participants). Only some of said profit is then significantly shared with individual participants at the top of the MLM distributorship pyramid. The earnings of those top few participants is emphasized and championed at company seminars and conferences, thus creating an illusion of how one can potentially become financially successful if they become a participants in the MLM. This is then advertised by the MLM company to recruit more distributors to participate in the MLM with a false anticipation of earning margins which are in reality merely theoretical and statistically improbable.[14]

MLMs are also criticized for being unable to fulfill their promises for the majority of participants due to basic conflicts with Western cultural norms.[57] There are even claims that the success rate for breaking even or even making money are far worse than other types of businesses:[58] "The vast majority of MLMs are recruiting MLMs, in which participants must recruit aggressively to profit. Based on available data from the companies themselves, the loss rate for recruiting MLMs is approximately 99.9%; i.e., 99.9% of participants lose money after subtracting all expenses, including purchases from the company."[58] In part, this is because encouraging recruits to further "recruit people to compete with [them]"[4] leads to "market saturation."[22] It has also been claimed "(b)y its very nature, MLM is completely devoid of any scientific foundations."[59]
This is my go-to checklist that I’ve been using before, during and after my FB Live broadcasts that have gotten me tens of thousands on eyeballs on my products and services! It’s no secret that doing FB Lives can bring you a lot of exposure and business, but sometimes it can be exhausting and intimidating to know if you’re doing them right to get people to actually take the next step with you…
Have a tent, paddle board, kayak or mountain bike? ShareShed allows you to rent out your adventure gear to others. Worried someone will snag a hole in your TETON sleeping bag? ShareShed has an insurance policy to cover any damages to your gear; just submit a claim within 72 hours after the return date of the item, and you will be reimbursed, easy. You can also apply to become a ShareShed ambassador to represent the company.
One of the reasons why direct selling tends to have a bad reputation is how much hype and deception is used by many representatives to lure recruits. This discourages many, and they end up believing that the MLM companies behind the products themselves encourage this type of behavior. If an MLM company is legitimate, it will always encourage you to be genuine with your customers and potential recruits. If you are absolutely in love with the product, then you will be better able to promote it to potential recruits. As long as you practice good business conduct, then your customers and recruits won’t feel duped. They will be more likely to stick with you that way. 

Great post, Dawn. I love your blog. My favorite tip on this list is to have the right mindset. Most people coming into the home business industry have never owned a business before, so they don’t really understand the entrepreneur mindset. When you are used to trading time for money, and then start a business and don’t get paid that way, it can be frustrating.
Hi JP. Good stuff all the way around, my man. Hey, I’ve been approached by Ariix, & didn’t know if have heard of them, and if so, a simple 👍 or 👎 will suffice, unless you’d like to elaborate, of course. One obvious concern I have is that (& can disclose this, since it’s of public record/knowledge per the list above), the current leadership in place at Ariix all came from USANA, and given the FBI/SEC became involved with USANA in ‘07, & Ariix opened in ‘11, well….I think you know from where I’m coming as it relates to anything you may be able to convey. Thx again, JP, for all of your efforts, & if you’d feel more comfortable in emailing me, obviously that would be perfectly fine! And apologies on this extremely verbose message!😳

Many people are scared of the prospect of getting into network marketing. They’ve heard all about the myths and misunderstandings surrounding the industry, also known as multilevel marketing, and so they shy away from it. To be sure, a multilevel marketing (MLM) business has just about as much success as any other business, if not more, and there are plenty of great network marketing companies out there, like Acti Labs, that have brought massive success to their members. It doesn’t matter what kind of home business you start as the real success of the business comes from the work you put in to build the business.

Question your recruiter. When you've found a company you're interested in, you'll likely meet with a recruiter or another representative. Be skeptical during the recruitment process. Remember that your sponsor makes more money if you sign on, so he may not be as open with you as he could be. Don't get distracted by promises of how much money you'll make and really think about what you're about to do.[4]
“I wouldn’t be where I am today without the knowledge I gained from [Michael’s] live events and training CDs. Two MUST-HAVE [programs] in your CD library should be ‘The Total Success Pack‘ and ‘Building a Better Life.’ I’ve listened so many times I’ve lost  count. PRICELESS information for your journey to success in business and in life… ‘Easy to do. Easy not to do’ The choice is yours.” 

I joined in the mid-90’s under a Dr that paid my way. We were somewhere in Paul Orberson’s dowline, below an AR kid making $80K+/month. I didn’t actually sign anyone as a rep, and just enjoyed doing the pitch to the crowd in the hotels, restaurants, and eventually auditoriums. I got paid by the Dr to tell the “long distance” story, and he went all the way to there top tier in under a year.
I recently spoke with San Diego based, Vicki Martin, about her experience with Rodan + Fields. Here's her take on her home business and why the opportunity was so appealing for her and her family, "The decision to join Rodan + Fields Dermatologists came easily. Since 2008 the construction industry [which I was previously in] has been hit hard by our economic downturn and my income has been greatly affected. We were working harder for less like many of our friends. Being part of Rodan + Fields Dermatologists is allowing me to work with highly educated people who share a passion for business and for teamwork. Building a recurring, residual income that grows month over month is going to give my husband and I the peace of mind and financial freedom that is so vitally important to our future. My skin looks better than ever. And, I get to work my job around the rest of my life instead of the other way around."

Hello John your tips are all very helpful.I am starting my home business and this is my first time.I tried my best to concentrate and will never give up.My small business is helping mothers in our community.They said that this business really help them to earn extra money.But still I know that deep inside I am not yet satisfied.Because I know that there is something missing or there is something wrong in my running of my business. .I hope you can give me more tips about this.

As non-employees, participants are not protected by legal rights of employment law provisions. Instead, salespeople are typically presented by the MLM company as "independent contractors" or "independent business owners". However, participants do not possess a business in the traditional legal sense, as the participants do not hold any tangible business assets or intangible business goodwill able to be sold or purchased in a sale or acquisition of a business. These are the property of the MLM company.


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Français: devenir pro du marketing en réseau, Español: tener éxito en las redes de mercadeo, Deutsch: Im Network Marketing erfolgreich werden, Português: Alcançar o Sucesso com Marketing Multinível, Italiano: Avere Successo nel Network Marketing, 中文: 成功进行网络营销, Русский: преуспеть в сетевом маркетинге, Nederlands: Succesvol zijn in netwerkmarketing, Bahasa Indonesia: Sukses Di Pemasaran Jaringan, العربية: النجاح في مجال التسويق الشبكي, Tiếng Việt: Thành công trong việc kinh doanh theo mạng, ไทย: ประสบความสำเร็จในการตลาดแบบเครือข่าย
Thoroughly enjoyed reading your mlm breakdowns and the comments, thank you Jeremy. Had a successful mlm business but had to make a decision to give it up or have a breakdown due to ongoing upline bullying so at a big crossroads at the minute. being an ‘older’ lady here in the north of England doesn’t bode well for conventional job hunting in the current economic climate so some serious thinking needed on my part and QUICKLY lol. Thanks again Jeremy x

The Leadpower Promise: Here at LeadPower we talk through experience, we have been generating leads since 1998 and have helped over 167,779 network marketers. The founder of our company founder has been a network marketer himself for over 20 years. He has built some very large groups consisting of well over hundreds of thousands of distributors. He understands how network marketing works and understands sauce how lead generation works as well.


The Direct Selling Association (DSA), a lobbying group for the MLM industry, reported that in 1990 only 25% of DSA members used the MLM business model. By 1999, this had grown to 77.3%.[26] By 2009, 94.2% of DSA members were using MLM, accounting for 99.6% of sellers, and 97.1% of sales.[27] Companies such as Avon, Electrolux, Tupperware,[28] and Kirby were all originally single-level marketing companies, using that traditional and uncontroversial direct selling business model (distinct from MLM) to sell their goods. However, they later introduced multi-level compensation plans, becoming MLMs.[23] The DSA has approximately 200 members[29] while it is estimated there are over 1,000 firms using multi-level marketing in the United States alone.[30]
Multi-level marketing companies are not required to release information about the average income of distributors in the United States. However, some MLMs do release this information in what is called an income disclosure statement. If you would like to see the amount of income gained by distributors on average for a specific MLM, search the company’s name in Google + “income disclosure statement.”
Roadie is the neighbor-to-neighbor shipping network that connects “Roadie” drivers to people who need items shipped from one location to another. Roadies can browse “Gigs” by price, location, distance and size and decide which gigs they want to take. The majority of local Gigs pay between $8-20, and long distance Gigs with oversized items can pay up to $200. When on the road, Roadies get special discounts on food, gas, and more.
This book was co-authored by my good friend and Lady Boss, Jessica Higdon. I not only love cause I’m in it (wink wink) but because it showcases many success stories from everyday people that have created amazing results in Network Marketing. I have multiple copies of this book on hand to share with my prospects as an amazing recruiting tool. I suggest you order a few copies too!

This is my go-to checklist that I’ve been using before, during and after my FB Live broadcasts that have gotten me tens of thousands on eyeballs on my products and services! It’s no secret that doing FB Lives can bring you a lot of exposure and business, but sometimes it can be exhausting and intimidating to know if you’re doing them right to get people to actually take the next step with you…
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